Are You Entitled to a Job After Graduation?

by Joe Lavelle on August 12, 2009

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In my forthcoming book, Act As If It Were Impossible to Fail, I use my experience as a business advisor and personal growth consultant to share with readers many tips for greater career success.  My goal is to help those who are motivated to work hard and be leaders in their chosen field to achieve the promotions and pay raises that they desire.  One of the issues that I address is what I refer to as “The Entitlement Conundrum.”  When employees believe that they are due a higher salary or another step up the corporate ladder simply due to being with a business for a certain period of time or because they have an admirable attendance record at meetings, they are approaching their career with the wrong attitude.  If you want to get ahead in your chosen profession, you should constantly be asking yourself how you can offer more to your current employer and how you might take intiative to get noticed by those who may influence the next steps in your career.

One of my favorite blogs GradtoGreat.com, written by Anne Brown & Beth Zefo, was created to help college students with the transition to the professional world by making them the best job candidates possible.  In a post that was published on Tuesday of this week, the site sheds light on the fact that the sense of entitlement can begin before a first job is even secured.  The posting shares the story of Trina Thompson, a woman who is suing her alma mater of Monroe College in the Bronx because the school did not secure her a job in the IT field upon graduation.  Apparently, she expected to walk across the stage and receive the keys to her new office along with her diploma.  With her lawsuit, she likely is now alienating future employers as well as the school that would have helped her with a job search if she had taken the first step.  Maybe she will learn her entitlement lesson early and make the behavioral corrections that will help her to achieve professional success in the future.

I hope you will read Act As If It Were Impossible to Fail when it is released next month.  Whether you are still in college and considering how to prepare for life after graduation or if you are twenty years into your career and feel like you have reached a plateau, the advice in my book will apply to you.

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