Will Your Career Accelerate Faster in a New City?

by Joe Lavelle on October 18, 2009

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I encourage my clients always to be thinking about new ways to challenge themselves and learn within their profession.  Maybe it means returning to school to add a new skill set to your resume.  Perhaps you need to take on extra responsibilities in your current position so that you are ready to jump in when that promotion becomes available.  Or, in some instances, you might just make the decision that you are going to thrive in your chosen career by moving to a completely new location.

There are several good reasons for moving in order to develop your profession.  You may be interested in a field that has geographic restrictions.  You probably don’t want to get involved in the music publishing industry in a city without any record labels, for instance.  Or, the opposite could be true.  Maybe you see an area of the country that is without a business that could be beneficial to its residents and profitable to you.  You may be moving to provide a better life for your family.  Or … maybe to get away from family!  Perhaps a renowned expert in your field lives across the country and you are determined to make that person your mentor.  Whatever your reason may be, Penelope Trunk features some great tips for long-distance job hunting on her blog.

Two key pieces of advice she offers are:

1. Build a local network — Start to connect with professional groups in the city to which you plan to move.  Penelope encourages her readers to develop real relationships with people who will become invested in your success.  As I’ve often shared on this blog and Penelope writes as well, most jobs are a result of effective networking.

2. Pitch why you are special — Penelope wisely points out that places like San Francisco or New York City do not have to look outside the city to find qualified job applicants.  If you are looking to move to one of these high-demand areas, you need to figure out why an employer will find it worth his time to bring you from halfway across the country to fill a position.

I encourage you to read the rest of the article and learn some other great tips about long-distance job searches.

In my new book, Act As If It Is Impossible to Fail, I offer a lot of advice concerning how to excel at your job, whether you’ve moved across the country or you are working in your hometown.  I also teach you how to move forward in your career and reach the position that you desire.  I hope you will check it out!

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{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Cathy GoodwinNo Gravatar October 27, 2009 at 2:07 am

As the author of a book on moving, I would agree with you. Moving can be challenging withh or without a job. You can’t assume jobs will exist in your field, even in a big city. And moving to a small town holds it own challenges. I encourage everyone to create a support system *before* you move, because it can take a long time to make new friends.

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Joe LavelleNo Gravatar November 2, 2009 at 12:07 am

Hi Cathy – thanks for adding your insight. I have moved so many times it seems easy to me, but I am sure that a potential move can be overwhelming to many. I can’t wait to read your book. Best wishes! -Joe

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